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Pocket Projection – Use in the Theatre

In today’s blog we’ve got a great Q&A interview with Filskit Theatre Company who use our pocket projectors, especially the Adapt 305, in their theatre performances. Blending art with cutting edge technology, the Company’s use of projectors has been hailed by the London Fringe Review as ‘innovative’, projection ‘onto walls, people and backing sheets’ really setting them apart from other practitioners. We’re always keen to hear about the different ways customers put their pocket projectors to use and Filskit’s imaginative experimentation with multimedia in the theatre is truly fascinating. Read on to find out more!

1. Tell us a little about Filskit Theatre Company:

Filskit Theatre is an ensemble of four female performers; we are all graduates of Rose Bruford College. We started Filskit Theatre in 2008 after completing a course in visual theatre in Barcelona. Our work is based on the relationship between the physical performer and projected image. This includes how the body can be used as a canvas for projection, how the performers can interact with the projected image and how the projectors can be puppeteered by the performers.

2. Why and how do you incorporate pocket projection into your performances?

Our use of pocket projection began in 2008. As part of our Ba Hon European Theatre Arts Course we chose to investigate the relationship between the live performer and projected image, this investigation culminated in a twenty minute performance which was later extended and became our first piece "The Living Canvas".

We use pocket projectors because they are small and easy for the performers to carry and manipulate, the in-built memory and battery also mean that we are free of wires so moving around is a lot easier.

3. In what way is projection used in your latest performance 'Snow White'?

In our latest piece, a re-telling of "Snow White", we use the pocket projectors to project images onto people, props and clothes to transport the audience into the fairytale world. The projectors are used throughout the piece by the narrators as a story telling devise. We also use videos as a means of communication from the evil step-mother, a modern take on this traditional tale.

4. What does the future hold for Filskit Theatre Company?

Our dream is to become a touring theatre company, to carry on devising shows and expand our collection of pocket projectors so that we can branch out into running workshops. We already have exciting plans in place to finish "Snow White" in the New Year.

Thanks to Sarah for taking the time to talk to us about Filskit’s work. Find out more about Filskit Theatre's pocket projector of choice, the highly portable Adapt 305, on our product page. Take a look at Filskit Theatre’s website for up to date information on latest performances: www.filskittheatre.com.

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