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Monthly Archives: January 2018

  • Acer VL7860 vs Optoma UHZ65 4K Laser Projector Review

    A Home Cinema Projector to rival your local Cineworld is now well within reach for many, thanks to host of 4k projectors, but if you want to maximise your viewing time without maintenance then 4k laser projectors offer an ideal solution. The Acer VL7860 and the New Optoma UHZ65 both offer indulgent and rich 4K viewing at sizes traditional TVs just can't handle, but which is better?

    Why laser?

    By using a laser light source instead of traditional lamp-based technology both projectors offer a 20,000 hour life span, the Acer VL7860 projector can extend this to 30,000 hours with it's eco-mode. That kind of life span is enough to watch the entire marvel movie cinematic universe (with added TV episodes) 125 times continuously!  Having an eco mode is also especially important to consider when using the 4k UHD projector for long periods, meaning a lower cost of ownership in the long term.

    Brightness and Image Quality

    Both the 4K Home Cinema Projectors deliver 3000 Ansi Lumens of brightness, in real terms that is enough to create a sharp image at all hours of the day. If you're finding the lumens ratings a bit tricky to handle check out this lumens guide. As the Optoma UHZ65 is also designed for business and education sectors it also offers a staggering 2,000,000:1 contrast ratio for crystal clear details even at massive signage sizes, ideal for exhibitions or museums.

    A common misconception when dealing with projectors comes from their perceived inability to handle high frame rates and heavy action scenes. Both of these 4K UHD Projectors have their own ways to project at the movie standard of 24 frames per second, with PureMotion/AccuMotion technology built in to handle fast moving scenes or gaming.

    Laser technology provides accurate, true to life colour reproduction with the Optoma UHZ65 delivering 80% of DCI-P3 coverage- basically meaning it can produce a wide and diverse range of Ultra HD colours.

    Installation and creating your own 4K Home Cinema.

    Both Projectors offer a vertical lens shift of 15% so you can ceiling mount them without fear of losing that cinema feeling with a skewed image. Despite this handy feature, 4k home cinema is more than just a projector. If you do want to create your own 4K Home Cinema you'll need more pieces than just the projector, read our 4k home cinema set up guide.

    Image result for 4K HOME CINEMA

    Affordability

    Here comes the clincher, the Optoma UHZ65 may be delivering a marginally sharper image but priced at £4999.99 can it really compete with the Acer VL7860's  price point of £3499.99?

    The Optoma UHZ65 may have a sharper image but at over £1000 more that's what you would expect.  Offering a lower cost of ownership and a lower initial cost the Acer VL7680 has affordability covered in this high-end category.

    So what's the verdict?

    If you're looking for a truly mesmerising 4k UHD Projector experience and have the extra cash to spend the Optoma UHZ65 seems to fit the bill. For those looking for a comparable, hassle free, immersive experience without the price tag the Acer VL7860 is ideal.

    For an alternative to the Optoma UHZ65 also see the ultra high end Acer V9800

  • HDMI 2.1 and 4K Home Cinema HDMI Guide

    Most people don't consider their cables when upgrading their home cinema projector, but with advances in 4K you'll need to think carefully about your setup. If you're looking to upgrade your home cinema projector but are still stuck with an old HDMI cable this guide can show you how your cable will perform.

    How to setup my 4k projector

    There is debate over whether HDMI cables should be listed as their 'version' number or just as 'standard' or 'high speed' but essentially version 2.0 and above is high speed. A 4K Home Cinema projector like the Acer V7850 has a HDMI 2.0 input specifically for 4K so you will need a HDMI 2.0 cable to get the full 4K experience.

    HDMI 1.4 only supports up to 4k 30hz,  whereas HDMI 2.0 can support 4k 60hz, ideal for 4k home cinema viewing. Connecting your HDMI 1.4 to a 4K projector will give you an up-scaled 1080p image, not quite the 4K clarity available.

    Any High-speed HDMI cable will do for your home cinema, they are now relatively cheap, and 'high speed' is just the name for HDMI 2.0 cables which are now the most commonly available since 2013.

    What is HDMI 2.1?

    Image result for hdmi 2.1

    Essentially, HDMI 2.1 has the capability to double-down on what HDMI 2.0 can manage. 2.1-standard cables will be able to easily outstrip the 4K limit, future proofing your set up with a maximum sending a maximum of 10K content at 120fps down the cable. HDMI 2.1 can even handle dyanmic HDR and variable refresh, adjusting pixels on-the-fly for crystal clear depth and focus.

    Will I need anything else for my 4K Home Cinema?

    You also need to consider the source of the 4K content, whether it's a Blu-ray player, games console or a AV receiver you'll need something that can send a 4K signal.

    The Bottom Line

    Getting 4K into your home is far more involved than just buying a 4K home cinema projector. You need the right pieces of the puzzle for it to work, otherwise you're just watching up-scaled 1080i/1080p, which isn't bad, but it's not 4K.

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